Affiliated Researchers

The Takedown Project connects researchers worldwide in a larger conversation about the regulation of online expression–focused on but not limited to notice and takedown. This group of researchers will engage in a collective discussion of research questions and methodologies will generate new insights and research directions.

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Meg Ambrose
Georgetown University, Communication, Culture & Technology
Georgetown University, Communication, Culture & Technology
Meg Ambrose is an assistant professor in Georgetown University’s Communication, Culture & Technology department where she researches and teaches in the area of technology law and policy. Her research interests cover a range of technology policy issues including comparative information and privacy law, engineering design and ethics, the use of history in technology policy, robotics law and policy, and the governance of emerging technologies. She has held fellowships and research positions with the NSF funded eCSite project in the University of Colorado Department of Computer Science, the Silicon Flatirons Center at the University of Colorado School of Law, the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet & Society, and CableLabs. Ambrose received her B.A. and J.D. from the University of Illinois and her Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Engineering & Applied Science, Technology, Media & Society. Her current book project, Ctrl+Z: The Right to be Forgotten, analyzes social, legal, and technical issues surrounding digital oblivion (forthcoming, NYU Press).

 

Christina Angelopoulos
IViR
IViR
Christina Angelopoulos is a Ph.D. candidate at IViR. She studied law at the University of Athens and went on to complete her LL.M. course on European law at the University of Edinburgh. She joined IViR in 2008, where, alongside other research projects, she worked as editor for IRIS, the monthly newsletter on audiovisual law published by the European Audiovisual Observatory. As part of the Europeana Connect project, she also performed and coordinated the legal research behind the creation of IViR and NL Kennisland’s online Public Domain Calculators.

 

Jef Ausloos
CiTiP at University of Leuven
CiTiP at University of Leuven

Jef Ausloos is a Doctoral Researcher at the University of Leuven, Faculty of Law (iMinds – CiTiP). He has worked both in academia and civil society organizations in Hong Kong and the USA and holds law degrees from the University of Namur (B.A.), University of Leuven (M.A.) and University of Hong Kong (LL.M). Ausloos has written on a variety of topics in the area of privacy law and media law. Currently, his research focuses on issues that lie at the intersection of Privacy and Data Protection, Freedom of Expression and Intermediary Liability on the Internet. In his PhD, Ausloos is looking more closely at the distribution of control over personal data between online corporate entities and data subjects. 

 

Sharon Bar Ziv
Haifa Center for Law and Technology
Haifa Center for Law and Technology

Dr. Sharon Bar-Ziv is a Research Fellow at the Haifa Center for Law and Technology, at the Faculty of Law, University of Haifa. Bar-Ziv holds an LL.B. (Major in Law and Technology, 2004), LL.M. (Summa Cum Laude, 2007) and Ph.D. (2013), all from the University of Haifa, Faculty of Law. Dr. Bar-Ziv focuses in her research work on the interface between Law and Technology with a specific emphasis on patent law and patent policy. She is the recipient of various scholarship, including and visiting scholarships for research visits at both the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition in Munich, and at the ETH Professorship for Intellectual Property, Zurich. See more about Dr. Bar-Ziv here.

 

Annemarie Bridy
University of Idaho College of Law
University of Idaho College of Law

Professor Bridy specializes in Internet and intellectual property law, with specific attention to the impact of disruptive technologies on existing frameworks for the protection of intellectual property and the enforcement of intellectual property rights. She has been interviewed on intellectual property topics for national media outlets including The Wall Street Journal, The Miami Herald, and National Public Radio’s Marketplace Tech Report. She is active in the leadership of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Internet and Computer Law Section and has held visiting appointments at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and the Princeton University Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP). She is an occasional contributor to CITP’s Freedom to Tinker blog.

Before joining the faculty, Professor Bridy was an associate in the litigation group at the law firm of Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads in Philadelphia. She served as a judicial clerk for the Honorable William H. Yohn, Jr. of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and the Honorable Dolores K. Sloviter of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.

Professor Bridy holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Irvine and a J.D., magna cum laude, from the Temple University James E. Beasley School of Law, where she was a member of the Temple Law Review.

 

Lilian Edwards
CREATe / University of Strathclyde Glasgow
CREATe / University of Strathclyde Glasgow

Lilian Edwards’ principal research interests are in the law relating to the Internet, the Web and new technologies, with a European and comparative focus. She has co-edited three bestselling collections on Law and the Internet (Hart Publishing, 1997, 2000 and 2009) with Charlotte Waelde, and a third collection of essays The New Legal Framework for E-Commerce in Europe was published in 2005. Her work in on-line consumer privacy won the Barbara Wellbery Memorial Prize in 2004 for the best solution to the problem of privacy and transglobal data flows.

Edwards worked at Strathclyde University from 1986-1988 and Edinburgh University from 1989 to 2006 before moving to become Chair of Internet Law at Southampton from 2006-2008. She is Associate Director, and was co-founder, of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Centre for IP and Technology Law, funded from 2002-2012. She has taught IT, e-commerce and Internet law at undergraduate and postgraduate level since 1996 and been involved with law and artificial intelligence (AI) since 1985. She has been a visiting scholar and invited lecturer to universities in the USA, Canada, Australia, Mexico, and Latin America and has undertaken consultancy for the the European Parliament, the European commission and McAfee.

 

Niva Elkin-Koren
Haifa Center for Law and Technology
Haifa Center for Law and Technology

Niva Elkin-Koren is the founding director of the Haifa Center for Law & Technology (HCLT) and the former dean of the University of Haifa Faculty of Law. Her research focuses on the legal institutions that facilitate private and public control over the production and dissemination of information. She is currently focusing on studying the legal challenges arising from crowd management, exploring the nature of enforcement by online intermediaries, and developing a comprehensive approach to user rights under copyright law. Her CV and publications can be found here.

 

Kristofer Erickson
CREATe / University of Glasgow
CREATe / University of Glasgow

Kristofer Erickson holds a PhD in Political Geography from the University of Washington. Before joining the University of Glasgow, he was Senior Lecturer at Bournemouth University Media School from 2010 to 2013. He was appointed Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow in September 2013. His research is concerned with the intellectual property implications of amateur online content production. He was lead investigator on a 2012 study, funded by the IPO, to examine the impact of online music video parody on the economic interests of original artists. In 2013-2014 Erickson was co-investigator on an ESRC/IPO funded project to study the creative exploitation of works in the public domain.

The main focus of Erickson’s current work is the status of amateur media production in intellectual property law. This work draws on concepts such as transmedia, participatory culture, user-generated content and the social factory. He has additional academic interest in online communities more broadly and in particular, organized responses to the surveillance society.

 

Giancarlo Frosio
Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School
Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School

Giancarlo F. Frosio is the Intermediary Liability Fellow at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. Giancarlo is a qualified attorney with a doctoral degree (S.J.D.) in intellectual property law from Duke University Law School. Additionally, he holds an LL.M. with emphasis in intellectual property law from Duke Law School, an LL.M. in information technology and telecommunications law from Strathclyde University in Glasgow, and a law degree from Università Cattolica in Milan. His research focuses on copyright law, digitization, history of creativity, public domain, open access, Internet and user based creativity, intermediary liability of Information Service providers, network information economy, access to knowledge (A2K), and identity politics.

From 2010 to 2013, Frosio served as the Deputy Director and Lecturer of the LL.M. in intellectual property law jointly organized by WIPO and the University of Turin. He is also a fellow of the Nexa Research Center for Internet and Society in Turin, where he acted as Chief Editor and author of the Final Report of COMMUNIA, the European Thematic Network on the Digital Public Domain funded by the European Commission within the eContentplus framework. Recently, he also served as a Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham. The post was one of the research projects of the new Centre for Copyright and New Business Models in the Creative Economy (CREATe) funded by the UK Research Councils. He is the author of numerous legal articles and publications. At the moment, he is working on his book “Cumulative Creativity: From the Oral Formulaic Tradition to Digital Remix.”

 

Rebecca Giblin
Monash University

 

Tarleton Gillespie
Cornell University
Cornell University

Tarleton Gillespie is an assistant professor in the Departments of Communication and Information Science  at Cornell University. He also teaches in the Department of Science & Technology Studies. His first book, Wired Shut: Copyright and the Shape of Digital Culture was published by MIT Press in June 2007. He is a non-residential fellow with the Center for Internet and Society at the Stanford Law School. He is also husband to Jenna, father to Jonas, music enthusiast, semi-colon aficionado, karate brown belt, cafe vulture, and adamant refuser of simple answers. And, as should be obvious, he is fascinated with technology, culture, law, power, new media — and their intersection.

 

Kristoff Grospe
The American Assembly at Columbia University
The American Assembly at Columbia University

Kristoff Grospe is Project Specialist at The American Assembly at Columbia University. He joined the Assembly in 2012. He graduated from New York Law School, where he studied intellectual property, Internet, and information law and policy. During law school, he was an active member of the school’s Institute for Information Law and Policy; worked with the Program in Law and Journalism as well as the Center for New York City Law. He graduated from New York University with a BA in Sociology.

 

Gwen Hinze
UC Berkeley School of Law

 

Martin Husovec
Stanford Center for Internet and Society (Visiting Researcher) / Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition

 

Margot Kaminski
Ohio Sate University Moritz College of Law
Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

Margot Kaminski is an Assistant Professor at the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law. From 2011 to 2014, she served as the executive director of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, and remains an affiliated fellow. She is a graduate of Harvard University and Yale Law School. While at Yale Law School, she co-founded the Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic. She clerked for The Honorable Andrew J. Kleinfeld of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and has been a Radcliffe Research Fellow at Harvard and a Google Policy Fellow at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Her research and advocacy work focuses on media freedom, online civil liberties, international intellectual property law, and surveillance issues. She has written widely on law and technology for law journals and the popular press.

 

Joe Karaganis
The American Assembly at Columbia University
The American Assembly at Columbia University

Joe Karaganis joined The American Assembly as Vice President in 2010. His work focuses on the relationship between digital convergence and cultural production, and has recently included research on broadband adoption, data policy, and media piracy. He is the editor of The Politics of Open Source Adoption (2005), Structures of Participation in Digital Culture (2007), and Media Piracy in Emerging Economies (2011), among other work. Prior to joining the American Assembly, he was a program director at the Social Science Research Council in New York.

 

Sonia Katyal
UC Berkeley School of Law
UC Berkeley School of Law

Professor Katyal’s scholarly work focuses on intellectual property, art law, civil rights (including gender, race and sexuality), property theory, and technology/new media. Her past projects have studied the relationship between copyright enforcement and surveillance; the impact of artistic activism on trademark law, commerce and advertising; and the intersection between copyright law and gender with respect to fan-generated works. Katyal also works on issues relating to intellectual property and indigenous people’s rights, with a special focus on cultural property and trademark law in the United States and abroad. Her current projects focus on the intersection between technology, internet access and civil/human rights, with a special focus on the right to information, and a variety of projects on the intersection between gender, sexuality, and the commons.

Click here for additional information.

 

Daphne Keller
Stanford Center for Internet and Society
Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Daphne Keller is the incoming Director of Intermediary Liability at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society.  She was previously Associate General Counsel for Intermediary Liability and Free Speech issues at Google.  In that role she focused primarily on legal and policy issues outside the U.S., including the E.U.’s evolving “Right to Be Forgotten.” Her earlier roles at Google included leading the core legal teams for Web Search, Copyright, and Open Source Software. Daphne has taught Internet law as a Lecturer at U.C. Berkeley’s School of Law, and has also taught courses at Berkeley’s School of Information and at Duke Law School.  She has done extensive public speaking in her field, including testifying before the UK’s Leveson Inquiry. Daphne practiced in the Litigation group at Munger, Tolles & Olson.  She is a graduate of Yale Law School and Brown University, and mother to some awesome kids in San Francisco.

 

Dalit Ken-Dror Feldman
Haifa Center for Law and Technology

 

Aleksandra Kuczerawy
CiTiP at University of Leuven

 

Thomas Margoni
IViR
IViR

Dr. Thomas Margoni is a senior researcher at the Institute for Information Law. His research focus concentrates on the relationship between law (primarily copyright, designs, and patents), new technologies, and the Internet, from a comparative and international point of view. He is Marie Curie grant holder, and conducts a variety of research studies at the EU level. Margoni is regularly invited at international conferences, is a member of different initiatives connected with intellectual property, new technologies, and the Internet, and has served as an IP advisor for private and public entities.

Since 2008 he has been a non-resident fellow at the Nexa center for Internet and Society. See complete CV here.

 

Joe McNamee
European Digital Rights

 

Luiz Fernando Marrey Moncau
Stanford Center for Internet and Society
Stanford Center for Internet and Society

Luiz Fernando Marrey Moncau is the Intermediary Liability Fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. He was previously the head of the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) at the law school of the Getulio Vargas Foundation in Rio de Janeiro (FGV DIREITO RIO), where he coordinated and conducted research on freedom of expression, intellectual property, Internet regulation, consumer rights and telecommunications regulation.

Moncau has worked as a lawyer and policy analyst in the Advocacy Department of the Brazilian Institute for Consumer Defense (IDEC), and as a consultant for the Brazilian Ministry of Justice on telecommunications and consumers’ rights.

Moncau earned a law degree at the Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo and a master’s degree in constitutional law at Pontifícia Universidade Católica of Rio de Janeiro, where he is a Ph.D. candidate.

 

Tal Niv
Haifa Center for Law and Technology
Haifa Center for Law and Technology

Tal Niv is a Research Fellow at the Haifa Center for Law and Technology, and a PhD candidate at the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program at Berkeley Law. Her current research revolves around the measurable impact that different online policies have on the different activities that users of online platforms engage in.  See more here.

 

Pablo Palazzi
Program on Internet Law and Communications Technologies at Universidad de San Andrés
Program on Internet Law and Communications Technologies at Universidad de San Andrés

Pablo Palazzi obtained his law degree from the School of Law of Universidad Católica Argentina. In May 2000, he obtained a Master in Law (LL.M) from Fordham Law School in New York with a focus on IP & IT matters. Palazzi is admitted to practice law in Argentina and in New York. Prior to becoming a lawyer, Palazzi was a computer programmer.

Palazzi is partner at Allende & Brea since January 2012. Before that, he worked as an associate at Morrison & Foerster LLP in New York and was also a law clerk in the Supreme Court of Argentina. Palazzi has written the following books in Spanish: International Transfer of Personal Data to Latin America (Ad Hoc, 2003, LLM thesis), Data Protection Law (Errepar, 2005), Credit Reporting Law (Astrea, 2008), Computer Crimes (Delitos informáticos), and Internet Intermediaries Liability (Abeledo Perrot, 2012). He is a co-chair of the International Association of Privacy Professionals Argentina’s chapter.

Palazzi is the Director of the Program on Internet Law and Communications Technologies at Universidad de San Andrés in Buenos Aires and is a frequent contributor to the Program’s blog (www.ditc.com.ar). He also teaches IP law and is the editor of the Latin America Data Protection Magazine, a Privacy International Project.

 

Darian Pavli
Open Society Foundations
Open Society Foundations

Darian Pavli is senior attorney on freedom of information and expression issues with the Open Society Justice Initiative. Based in the New York office, he has been involved, among other things, with impact litigation before international human rights mechanisms, and has played a leading role in efforts to establish the right of access to government information as a basic human right internationally.

Pavli works closely with human rights groups in Africa, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and elsewhere to address a broad range of freedom of expression and information deficits, and writes and speaks extensively on these issues. Prior to joining the Open Society Justice Initiative, Pavli was the Southern Balkans researcher for Human Rights Watch and a senior attorney for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe’s Mission in Albania. He taught constitutional law in his native Albania, and holds advanced law degrees from NYU Law School and Central European University. Pavli is a founder and steering committee member of the International Media Lawyers’ Association.

 

Miquel Peguera
Universitat Oberta de Catalunya
Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

Miquel Peguera is an Associate Professor of Law at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) (Barcelona, Spain). He holds a PhD in Law from the University of Barcelona (2006), with a dissertation on the liability of Internet intermediaries and was a visiting Scholar at the University of Columbia School of Law (2007-08). His research focuses on the legal aspects of the information society, and particularly on ISPs’ liability. His publications include “When the Cached Link is the Weakest Link: Search Engine Caches under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act”, 56 Journal of the Copyright Society of the U.S.A. 589 (2009); “The DMCA Safe Harbors and Their European Counterparts: A Comparative Analysis of Some Common Problems”, 32 Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts 481 (2009). He is the author of the book La exclusión de responsabilidad de los intermediarios en Internet (Comares, 2007) and editor of the handbook Principios de Derecho de la Sociedad de la Información (Aranzadi, 2010). A list of publications can be found at http://ispliability.wordpress.com/about/.

Professor Peguera is a co-editor of the Journal of Intellectual Property, Information Technology and E-Commerce Law (jipitec.eu). Before joining the academia, he worked as a lawyer in Barcelona. Professor Peguera blogs on ISP liability at http://ispliability.wordpress.com/.

 

 

Jon Penney
Oxford Internet Institute / Berkman Center for Internet and Society
Oxford Internet InstituteBerkman Center for Internet and Society

Jon Penney is a legal academic, doctoral student at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford (Balliol College), and a Research Fellow/Affiliate at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University, as well as The Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

In 2011, Penney was also a Google Policy Fellow at the Citizen Lab, where he led the ONI Transparency Project, a new project under the Open Net Initiative, a research collaboration between the Lab and the Berkman Center at Harvard University, which examines global Internet censorship and surveillance. He was also Project Coordinator for the Privacy Value Networks Project, a large scale, multi-university EPSRC funded project on data privacy, led by the OII’s Ian Brown. And since 2013, he’s been a member of the Program Committee for the Free and Open Communications on the Internet (FOCI) workshop at USENIX security symposium, an interdisciplinary workshop for lawyers, infosec practitioners, and social scientists, researching Internet censorship, surveillance, and its detection / circumvention.

A native Nova Scotian and graduate of Dalhousie, Penney previously studied at Columbia Law School as a Fulbright Scholar and at Oxford, where he was associate editor of the Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal and a Mackenzie King Travelling Scholar. In 2009-2010, he taught law as a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand. And before all that, he worked as a litigation lawyer and, from time to time, as a policy advisor at the federal level.

His research, broadly speaking, concerns constitutional (human rights) law, intellectual property, and digital media policy, particularly censorship, privacy, and security.

 

Nati Perl
Haifa Center for Law and Technology

 

Matti Rockenbauch
University of Gottingen
University of Gottingen

Matti Rockenbauch is a lawyer and PhD candidate at the Georg August University of Göttingen, Germany. His thesis is about legal and interdisciplinary issues of pornography. Between 2011 and 2014 he worked as a research associate at Prof. Gerald Spindler’s chair at the University of Göttingen. In August 2014 Rockenbauch moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, to pursue his research at the University of Michigan both as a researcher and as a graduate student (LL.M.) and Michigan Grotius Fellow.

 

Uri Sabach
Haifa Center for Law and Technology

 

Brianna Schofield
UC Berkeley School of Law
UC Berkeley School of Law

Brianna Schofield is a Research and Policy Fellow in the Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic at Berkeley Law. Her research interests focus on the intersection of law and technology, particularly as it relates to privacy, intellectual property regimes, and free speech. She recently authored, with Jennifer Urban, an amicus curiae brief on behalf of independent media producers in Viacom v. Google. Prior to joining Berkeley Law, she was a Special Deputy Attorney General in the Executive Office of the California Attorney General where she worked on investigative, legislative, and negotiated solutions to advance consumer privacy. She has a J.D. from Berkeley Law and a BS from the London School of Economics.

 

Wolfgang Schultz
Hans Bredow Institute / Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society

 

Wendy Seltzer
Berkman Center for Internet and Society
Berkman Center for Internet and Society

Wendy Seltzer is a Fellow with Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy, researching openness in intellectual property, innovation, privacy, and free expression online. As a Fellow with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Seltzer founded and leads the Chilling Effects Clearinghouse, helping Internet users to understand their rights in response to cease-and-desist threats. She serves on the Board of Directors of The Tor Project, promoting privacy and anonymity research, education, and technology; and the World Wide Web Foundation, U.S., dedicated to advancing the web and empowering people by improving Web science, standards, and generative accessibility of Web. She seeks to improve technology policy in support of user-driven innovation.

Last year, Seltzer was a fellow with the University of Colorado’s Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship in Boulder. She has taught Intellectual Property, Internet Law, Antitrust, Copyright, and Information Privacy at American University Washington College of Law, Northeastern Law School, and Brooklyn Law School and was a Visiting Fellow with the Oxford Internet Institute, teaching a joint course with the Said Business School, Media Strategies for a Networked World. Previously, she was a staff attorney with online civil liberties group Electronic Frontier Foundation, specializing in intellectual property and First Amendment issues, and a litigator with Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel.

Wendy speaks and writes on copyright, trademark, patent, open source, privacy and the public interest online. She has an A.B. from Harvard College and J.D. from Harvard Law School, and occasionally takes a break from legal code to program (Perl and MythTV).

 

Daniel Seng
Stanford University
Stanford University

Daniel Seng is an Associate Professor with the Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore. He is now working on his J.S.D. thesis on online intermediary liability with Stanford Law School. He has written and presented numerous papers and studies on digital copyright and intermediary liability issues at various local, regional and international conferences and workshops, including workshops and conferences organized by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights. He is also a special consultant to WIPO on an ongoing international study of Internet intermediary liability.

 

Gerald Spindler
University of Gottingen
University of Gottingen

Dr. Gerald Spindler studied Law and Economics in Frankfurt a.M., Hagen, Genf and Luasanne. He is a professor for Civil Law, Commercial and Economic Law, Comparative Law, Multimedia and Telecommunication Law at the University of Goettingen/Germany where he is mainly occupied with legal issues regarding corporate and securities law. Dr. Spindler is a member of various advisory boards, including the EU Commission (DG Enterprise). He is the editor of one of the leading commentaries on corporate law, co-editor of German law reviews on corporate law as well as the editor of the EU-Journal for Intellectual Property Law and E-Commerce-Law.

 

Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon
University of Southampton
University of Southampton

Dr. Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon is Associate Professor in Information Technology / Intellectual Property Law within Southampton Law School at the University of Southampton, specialising in Information Technology related issues. She is the Director of Ilaws, the Institute for law and the Web and its new core iCLIC. She is a member of the Southampton Cybersecurity Centre of Excellence as well as a member of the Web Science Institute.

Dr. Stalla-Bourdillon is the author of several legal articles, book chapters and books on intermediary liability, data protection and privacy. She has been researching and writing on the liability of Internet intermediaries such as Internet service providers, Web 2.0 platforms, search engines, on the legal implications of deep packet inspection practices implemented by Internet service providers, on the role of hosting providers in relation to malicious webpages, on standardization of privacy policies, on anonymisation practices and e-ID schemes.

She led the legal work conducted for the purposes of the FP7 research project on operational trustworthiness enabling technologies (FP7 OPTET). She also worked on the legal implications of data enrichment practices for the purposes of the Ordnance Survey Data Enrichment Project. She is now exploring anonymisation practices in the context of two research projects.

Dr. Stalla-Bourdillon has acted as an expert for the Organisation for the Cooperation and Security in Europe (in the field of intermediary liability) and for the Organisation for Economic Development and Cooperation (in the field of data protection, research data and anonymisation). She is part of the expert group formed by the Council of Europe on intermediary liability.

Dr. Stalla-Bourdillon is the creator of Peep Beep! (https://peepbeep.wordpress.com/), a blog dedicated to privacy and information law.

 

Nicolas Suzor
Queensland University of Technology
Queensland University of Technology

Dr Nicolas Suzor researches the regulation of networked society. He is a Senior Research Fellow in the Law School at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia, and a Chief Investigator of QUT’s Digital Media Research Centre, where he leads a program of research on the regulation and governance of the internet and social media.

Suzor is an ARC DECRA research fellow, studying the regulation of internet intermediaries and social media platforms. His research examines the peer economy, the governance of social networks, digital copyright, and knowledge commons. Suzor is also the Legal Lead of the Creative Commons Australia project and the deputy chair of Digital Rights Watch, an Australian non-profit organization whose mission is to ensure that Australian citizens are equipped, empowered and enabled to uphold their digital rights.

 

Natasha Tusikov
Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy
Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy

Natasha Tusikov is a postdoctoral fellow at the Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy at the State University of New York (SUNY) in Buffalo. She completed her PhD in sociology within the Regulatory Institutions Network at the Australian National University. Prior to undertaking her dissertation, she worked as a researcher with the Canadian federal government in the areas of cybercrime, money laundering, fraud and transnational crime. Her research interests include the transnational corporate regulation of intellectual property on the Internet, particularly the trade in counterfeit goods and voluntary regulation by Internet intermediaries.

 

Jennifer Urban
UC Berkeley School of Law
UC Berkeley School of Law

Jennifer Urban directs Berkeley Law’s Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic and is a clinical professor of law. Her research centers on legal and policy issues surrounding intellectual property, privacy and individual rights in a world of rapid technological and societal change. She has analyzed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s notice and takedown provisions since their inception, and is the author, with Laura Quilter, of an early study of notices housed at Chilling Effects. Prior to joining Berkeley Law, Urban founded and directed the USC Intellectual Property & Technology Law Clinic and worked as an attorney with the Venture Law Group in Silicon Valley.

 

Peggy Valcke
CiTiP at University of Leuven

 

Ot van Daalen
IViR
IViR

Ot van Daalen is a researcher in the field of privacy and security. In addition, he is founder and lawyer of law firm Digital Defence. Digital Defence is specialized in privacy and security law. In 2009, he founded the Dutch digital rights movement Bits of Freedom. There he was closely involved in the creation of legislation in the field of privacy and internet freedom. He is also a board member of the European digital rights organization EDRi.

Before launching Bits of Freedom, van Daalen worked for years at law firm De Brauw Blackstone Westbroek, inter alia for the high-tech- and telecoms sector. He studied at the University of Amsterdam and Columbia University in New York. He is an experienced speaker and is regularly asked an expert in the media.

At the IViR, van Daalen is involved in different research projects in the field of privacy and security.

 

Nico van Ejik
IViR
IViR

Nico van Eijk is Professor of Media and Telecommunications Law and Director of the Institute for Information Law (IViR, Faculty of Law, University of Amsterdam). He studied Law at the University of Tilburg and received his doctorate on government interference with broadcasting in 1992 from the University of Amsterdam. He also works as an independent legal adviser. Among other things, he is the Chairman of the Dutch Federation for Media and Communications Law (Vereniging voor Media- en Communicatierecht, VMC), a member of the supervisory board of the Dutch public broadcasting organisation (NPO) and chairman of two committees of The Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands (SER). See complete CV here.

 

Joris van Hoboken
IViR / New York University
IViR / New York University

Dr. Joris van Hoboken is a research fellow at the Information Law Institute of the New York University. At IViR he is a guest researcher and supervisor of PhD-theses.

His research addresses law and policy in the field of digital media, electronic communications and the internet. His interests include the implications of the fundamental right to freedom of expression and privacy online as well as the transatlantic comparison of different regulatory approaches to the online environment. He is a specialist in the field of search engine law and regulation and regularly writes, teaches and presents on the issues of data protection and intermediary liability on the Internet.

He graduated cum laude in both Theoretical Mathematics (2002, M.Sc.) and Law (2006, LL.M.) and serves as the chair of the Board of Directors of Bits of Freedom, a Dutch digital civil rights organization. Van Hoboken was awarded a Ph.D. by the University of Amsterdam (2012) for his thesis examining the implications of the right to freedom of expression for the legal governance of search engines.

In 2014 he received a prestigious award for his thesis by the Praemium Erasmianum Foundation. See complete CV here.

 

Paula Vargas
Program on Internet Law and Communications Technologies at Universidad de San Andrés
Program on Internet Law and Communications Technologies at Universidad de San Andrés

Paula Vargas obtained her law degree at Universidad Nacional de Córdoba. In 2013, she obtained a Master in Law (LL.M) at Berkeley School of Law with a focus on technology, privacy and intellectual property. Mrs. Vargas is admitted to practice law in Argentina.

Mrs. Vargas is a partner at Masserini, Rivero & Vargas, a law firm specialized on IP and Data Protection and she also works as a public policy consultant for Internet companies, particularly intermediaries.

Mrs. Vargas is currently pursuing a Master Degree on Personal Data Protection at Universidad San Pablo CEU, Madrid, Spain. She coordinates the Program on Internet Law and Communications Technologies at Universidad de San Andrés in Buenos Aires and is a frequent contributor to the Program’s blog. She is also a professor at Universidad de Buenos Aires, where she teaches “Technology Businesses”.

Mrs. Vargas is a co-chair of the International Association of Privacy Professionals Argentina’s chapter and one of the original organizers of Cibercafé, an interdisciplinary group of Internet professional who meet once a month to debate Internet public policies.

She recently wrote several papers addressing content removal and public interest.

 

Knud Wallberg
University of Copenhagenn, Faculty of Law, Centre for Information and Innovation Law
University of Copenhagenn, Faculty of Law, Centre for Information and Innovation Law

Knud Wallberg is a Post Doctoral Researcher at the University of Copenhagenn, Faculty of Law, Centre for Information and Innovation Law. He has previously worked both in civil administration (The Danish Patent and Trademark Office) for 10 years and in private practice as founder and partner of an IP-law firm in Copenhagen, Denmark, also for 10 years. From 2012-2015 he was a PhD fellow at the University of Copenhagen and defended his PhD thesis entitled “Use of Others´ Trademarks in Digital Media. A Contribution to the Clarification of the Content and Interfaces of Trademark Law” in June, 2015. Wallberg has written a number of articles and contributions to books on trademark and domain name law and practice and is a Specialist Member of the Danish Complaints Board for Domain names, UDRP Panelist with WIPO and .eu Panelist with CAC. His current research project is entitled “Removing illicit products from online marketplaces: Private enforcement tools as alternatives to court actions”, a project that is supported by a two year external grant from the Danish Council for Independent Research.

 

Nicolo Zingales
University of Sussex Law School
University of Sussex Law School

Nicolo Zingales is lecturer at University of Sussex Law School. He holds a law degree from the University of Bologna, and a PhD in international law and economics from Bocconi University. His research focuses mainly on antitrust, intellectual property, Internet law and governance. Prior to joining Tilburg University, he was a Google fellow for Research ICT Africa, where he worked on intermediary liability and Internet governance from an African perspective. He is co-founder and coordinator of the Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility, a member of the Observatory of Experts of the Internet & Jurisdiction Project and an assistant coordinator of the World Intermediary Liability Map Project of Stanford’s Center for Internet & Society.


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